AirCide products disinfect bacteria and mold 100%

AirCide is certified according to standards EN 13624, EN 13697, EN 13727 and EN 14476 by Measur Oy. But what do EN standards, and in particular these EN standards, mean?

 

The EU Standardization Agency has developed a number of different standards for testing the effectiveness of disinfectants. Standards can be used to ensure that different substances are effective and suitable for the uses defined in them. As a result of successful testing in accordance with the standard, the product is awarded certification in accordance with the standard.

 

EN = standard established by CEN (European standard). A link to the AirCide EN Standards Report can be found at the end of this publication.

 

AirCide products are suitable for healthcare and other demanding environments Within the framework of EN standards, AirCide products meet, for example, the requirements of healthcare and the product's effectiveness is suitable for surface disinfection with and without mechanics, textile disinfection, hygienic and surgical hand disinfection and instrument disinfection. In practice, this means that the effectiveness of AirCide is adequate, for example, for cleaning medical equipment in medical care, where there are very high requirements for cleaning and disinfection methods. For EN standards, the products are tested in practice with bacteria and yeasts to ensure complete efficacy. Listed below are the bacteria and yeasts that have been involved in the standard tests and are destroyed by AirCide.

Approved according to EN 14476 for healthcare use against the following viruses

Norovirus

Adenovirus

Poliovirus

 

These viruses are spread, for example, through contact and droplets. Viruses are quite common and can occur in many different environments.

 

Approved according to EN standard 13727 for healthcare use against the following bacteria

P. aeruginosa

E. hirae

S. aureus

E. coli

 

These bacteria are found in healthcare, restaurants and households. Approved according to EN standard 13624 for healthcare use against the following yeasts

 

C. albicans

A. brasiliensis

 

These yeast fungi are a problem e.g. in food production and food preparation, healthcare and various production facilities. Approved according to EN 13697 for industrial, food and household use against the following bacteria and yeasts.

 

S. aureus

E. coli

C. albicans

P. aeruginosa

E. hirae

A. brasiliensis

 

These bacteria and yeasts are found in healthcare, restaurants and households alike. What are these viruses, bacteria and yeasts mentioned above?

 

Norovirus

 

Norovirus belongs to the calicivirus. It causes a disease whose symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and often fever. It is the most common cause of sudden intestinal infections in countries with good hygiene, such as Finland.

 

Infection can occur from surfaces that have been touched by the patient (at home, for example, from light switches and door handles). Norovirus is contagious and its epidemic often also begins with drinking water or foods contaminated with human feces. In particular, epidemics have been linked to uncooked vegetables, such as frozen berries from abroad. The disease is also transmitted from bathing water.

 

Adenovirus

 

Adenoviruses usually cause inflammation of the upper respiratory tract, which is symptomatic of high fever. Children may experience febrile convulsions. Adenovirus infection can also lead to tonsillitis, otitis media, and pneumonia. Some adenoviruses cause diarrhea and inflammation of the eyes and urinary tract. Adenovirus infection is easily transmitted by droplets when coughing and sneezing or by touching, for example, the hands. Some adenoviruses can be transmitted from feces or bathing water.

Poliovirus

 

Poliomyelitis is a disease caused by the poliovirus. The poliovirus belongs to the picovirus enteroviruses. The infection can be acquired either by inhalation or orally. The virus travels through the digestive tract to the intestine, where it multiplies for several weeks. Sometimes the virus can spread from the gut to the central nervous system. Even an asymptomatic person can infect the disease.

 

P. aeruginosa

 

P. aeruginosa is a common and dangerous cause of nosocomial infections. For example, the bacterium can cause pneumonia in people with defects in the immune system. The bacterium is also a risk, for example, for those connected to a ventilator as well as for those treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics.

 

P. aeruginosa is inherently resistant to many antibiotics and disinfectants. It is also able to rapidly develop resistance to used antimicrobials. Pseudomonas is widely found in environments such as swimming pools, waterways, food, wetlands, and on the floors and surfaces of hospitals or other facilities. S. aureus S. aureus is a common bacterium found in the throat and nose of humans. The bacterium is one of the largest food poisoning bacteria in Finland. Symptoms include severe headache, severe nausea, and vomiting. Bacteria are a problem especially in the proper preparation and storage of food.

The bacterium infects food through the hands of the worker. Hair that has fallen into food can also contaminate the product. The most common intermediary foods are pre-prepared meals containing meat, fish and / or eggs that are eaten cold or processed with the bare hands. If the food is still stored at the wrong temperature, for example at room temperature, the bacteria in the food can multiply and produce toxins. The enterotoxins produced by S. aureus are highly heat-resistant, and heating does not destroy the toxins developed in the food.

 

A. brasiliensis

 

A. brasiliensis is a common contaminant in food and industrial plants. A. brasiliensis is dangerous for people with a weakened immune system or lung disease because the bacterium causes a variety of lung infections. A. brasiliensis is spread by interacting with spores. Spores can spread in hospitals and production facilities from the hands of workers or from equipment that has not been properly cleaned.

 

E. coli

 

E. coli is an intestinal bacterium that can cause urinary tract infections, among other things. E. coli also produces shigatoxins and causes diarrhea. The bacterium is often transmitted through poorly washed hands, poorly cooked food, drinking and bathing water, and animals. The E. coli virus should be given special consideration in the proper preparation and storage of food.

 

C. albicans

 

The bacterium can cause yeast infection if the balance of the body's normal microbiota changes, for example during a course of antibiotics. C. albicansia is found worldwide, but is most commonly endangered by immunocompromised individuals diagnosed with serious diseases such as HIV and cancer. Particularly high-risk individuals are patients who have recently undergone surgery, transplantation, or who are in intensive care units, so C. albicans should be given special consideration in health care.

 

E. hirae

 

E.hiraen has been reported to be associated with e.g. pancreatitis, urinary tract inflammation and gallbladder inflammation. The bacterium has so far been found in relatively few people, but the cases reported so far describe bacteremia associated with a serious and even life-threatening disease. The infection may come from your own bacterial flora or you may get the infection in a hospital.

  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Instagram
  • YouTube

Kauppakatu 39

40100 Jyväskylä

Materials:

©2020 by Aircide